English Literature

25 PARAGRAPHS ( PART 2) : CONSIDERING THE UGC NTA NET LATEST PATTERN


Having gone for a syllabus change along with its latest pattern for the Computer Based Test mode, UGC NTA NET asked the aspirants to have a base not only in literature but also in language especially how an aspirant of UGC NTA NET competitive exam tackles one liner questions as well the long paragraphs since it in its new syllabus has been asking questions on comprehensions and paragraphs to analyse the reading and the writing skills of the aspirants going to appear at the exam.

Therefore, I Vineet Pandey, with the experience of 8 NET, 2 JRF and 17 SET and the teaching experience in the Delhi University for 3 years have just assimilated few well-read paragraphs by the lovers of English Literature and also some of the favourites of UGC NTA NET Competitive Exam which will consist of 5 series.
Kindly go through them and thank you for the love, support and the understanding that all of you have provided Vineet Pandey and showered with.

25 PARAGRAPHS: MOSTLY LOVED AND READ ( part 2)

6 . But as the mind does not exist unless leagued with the soul, therefore it must have been that, in Ahab’s case, yielding up all his thoughts and fancies to his one supreme purpose; that purpose, by its own sheer inveteracy of will, forced itself against gods and devils into a kind of self-assumed, independent being of its own. Therefore, the tormented spirit that glared out of bodily eyes, when what seemed Ahab rushed from his room, was for the time but a vacated thing, a formless somnambulistic being, a ray of living light, to be sure, but without an object to colour, and therefore a blankness in itself.

—- Moby Dick, Herman Melville

Explanation- Ahab a tireless spirit who when faced with injustice and sadness of life decides to end them by facing them instead of accepting them as something already fated. He defied his fate and found the purpose in going against his fate. When the people of his age find reclusion and surrender to their situations, he nullified god and his ways.
A doer more and a dreamer less. He cast away his pleasures and safety just to pursue what his soul longs for. The pure and defiant heart who maddened by his desire to revenge keeps even looking for it in his sleep.

7 . “Deep in her soul, however, she was waiting for something to happen. Like a sailor in distress, she would gaze out over the solitude of her life with desperate eyes, seeking some white sail in the mists of the far-off horizon. She did not know what this chance event would be, what wind would drive it to her, what shore it would carry her to, whether it was a longboat or a three-decked vessel, loaded with anguish or filled with happiness up to the portholes. But each morning, when she awoke, she hoped it would arrive that day, and she would listen to every sound, spring to her feet, feel surprised that it had not come; then at sunset, always more sorrowful, she would wish the next day were already there.”

—- Madame Bovary, Gustav Flaubert

Explanation- A woman failing to understand what she desires in her life. Not finding something worth-living and fighting for which or whom she can own makes her feel so distressed that she eventually takes her life. May be waiting for a light to let her feel that happiness can even be found in the darkest hours.
She was desperately looking for something that she wished to happen to her everyday but seeking out would become more difficult in her monotonous life thus making her get involved with the existential peripheries of life so that she could at least get relieved from the callousness of her inner desire.

8 . “So you see ’’, said Stepan Arkadyich, ‘you’re a very wholesome man. That is your virtue and your defect. You have a wholesome character, and you want all of life to be made up of wholesome phenomena, but that doesn’t happen. So you despise the activity of public service because you want things always to correspond to their aim, and that doesn’t happen. You also want the activity of the individual man always to have an aim, that love and family life always be one. And that doesn’t happen. All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life are made up of light and shade.”

—- Anna Karenina, Leo Tolstoy

Explanation- If one has to find the meaning of life, one first will have to learn how differentiations complete each other and make life whole.

“All of life consists of the parts of something or the other.”

The wholesomeness comes from varieties. Light and shadow, public and private, individual and social together form the beauty and charm that one wants to experience in one’s life. Here the opposite of light is shade instead of darkness which shows the human quality of the existence. The shade or the shadow is the result of the existence once one understands that light automatically falls onto them creating a complete picture of what exists there between the lines.

9 . Women should be respected as well!
Generally speaking, men are held in great esteem in all parts of the world, so why shouldn’t women have their share? Soldiers and war heroes are honoured and commemorated, explorers are granted immortal fame, martyrs are revered, but how many people look upon women too as soldiers?…Women, who struggle and suffer pain to ensure the continuation of the human race, make much tougher and more courageous soldiers than all those big-mouthed freedom-fighting heroes put together!”One of the many questions that have often bothered me is why women have been, and still are thought to be, so inferior to men. It’s easy to say it’s unfair, but that’s not enough for me; I’d really like to know the reason for this great injustice!”

― Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl

Explanation- The striking feature of this holocaust writing is that a young girl who is hardly going to cross her Fourteen is talking about how women should be treated and respected as well as giving the reasons why they should be putting them equal to the other sections of the society ruled by men.
The very first line asks the readers to know that the half population must be treated not only with the equity but also equality giving a feministic approach to the passage.
She in her diary doesn’t claim to be just a girl but somewhere feels that she is a woman letting her feel that women should be revered for who they are and cherished for their independency gaining an inward strength and plenty of courage that keeps the continuation of the existence of the humanity on this earth.

10 . By hook or by crook, I hope that you will possess yourselves of money enough to travel and to idle, to contemplate the future or the past of the world, to dream over books and loiter at street corners and let the line of thought dip deep into the stream. For I am by no mean confining you to fiction. If you would please me—and there are thousands like me—you would write books of history and biography, and criticism and philosophy and science. …Young women, you are, in my opinion, disgracefully ignorant. You have never made a discovery of any sort of importance. You have never shaken an empire or led an army into battle. The plays of Shakespeare are not by you, and you have never introduced a barbarous race to the blessings of civilization. What is your excuse?

—- A Room of One’s Own, Virginia Woolf.

Explanation – A direct and straight declaration for the girls of the upcoming generation. More than an urge to discover oneself and explore the worth.
Virginia Woolf not only asks the audience and the readers to have a handful of money and the space of one’s own but also questions whether they will also have the capacity to write their own story not only restricted to fiction but also of different disciplines.
She does raise a question on female subjectivity and hopes that the generation ahead will find its own ways to be free from any kind of limit.

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